How Does Personal Injury Law Advertising Work?

Posted on March 15, 2017 in Personal Injury Lawyers

Personal Injury LawyersThe countless billboards and TV commercials for personal injury lawyers you’ve undoubtedly seen from your car and in your living room are examples of how attorneys reach their target audiences in this day and age. While this wasn’t always the case – lawyers couldn’t advertise until the U.S. Supreme Court allowed them to in 1977 – it’s now one of the main ways people find out about law firms like Wettermark & Keith when they need the help of a lawyer.

Senior founding partner James Wettermark spoke with Weld reporter Ryan Scott on the evolving world of personal injury law advertising and shared not only how advertising works, but also how the field works as whole for clients seeking compensation for their injuries. For example, Mr. Wettermark explained how contingency fees work, saying, “In 38 years, I have never had a client pay me a single penny out of their pocket. The only way I get paid is if I win the case, and that’s the way it should be, because it joins the client’s and my interests.”

The topic of stereotypes of “ambulance chasers” caused by lawyers advertising on TV and billboards was also discussed. According to Mr. Wettermark, “There’s a price to pay for advertising: there is a stigma that is attached to lawyers who advertise.” But things have changed, and now advertising is ubiquitous, even if each firm handles it differently. Wettermark & Keith ads, for instance, are described by Weld as being “much more restrained” and conveying “an impression of professionalism” compared to many popular ads on TV.

Ultimately, advertising is guided by a set of ethical and legal regulations that help maintain the propriety of the profession. “We don’t want to do anything that diminishes ourselves as individuals or our profession as a whole, so that’s why we try to adhere to what we can consider a high level of quality on our ads,” said Mr. Wettermark.

The full article from Weld can be read here.